Designers Heather Brock and Jennifer Wundrow of Nest Design Co. used a rug larger than the overall seating to make the room feel bigger. "This is often a misconception we find in people’s homes. They are of the mindset that a smaller rug makes a room feel larger, when in fact a smaller rug can make the room feel a bit more fragmented. We love when all the furniture sits on the rug creating an intimate and cohesive space," according to the designers.
Some of the best flea market, antique, or salvaged finds don't always appear to have an immediate use. When you come across something you love yet don't know where to put it, buy it and tuck it away as a rainy-day rustic decorating idea. As your living room design comes together, you'll find new ways to use old finds. In this rustic living room, for example, an 18th-century wall cabinet with its original paint stands in as a charming side table, and a wood crate becomes a coffee table centerpiece.
"The room doesn't get a lot of light, so I decided to make it cozy and turned it into an English-style portrait room, which is ridiculous, but fun," says celebrity chef Alex Hitz. Taking the cozy route in a living room without a ton of natural light is a great solution. And what's cozier than a floor-to-ceiling bookshelf with seating beckoning you to curl up on it? To display your books more creatively, offset them with artwork. In this room, a Peter Rogers portrait of Alex Hitz's close friend, the late Nan Kempner, hangs over the bookshelves to create some contrast.
Before you start choosing pieces for your living room, pick the main palette of one or two colors, and keep the main furniture pieces within those color families. Unlike busier, multicolor color schemes, sticking to one or two main colors will help create a clean, timeless aesthetic that will outlast trends – saving you time and money in the long run.
Some old homes harbor a gorgeous secret beneath plaster -- rough pine paneling, which some designers refer to as shiplap. It's an ideal wall treatment for staging a rustic living room. If your home isn't old, you can re-create the look in a new house with salvaged shiplap. Take the look floor-to-ceiling, as shown here, for dramatic impact, or design a more subtle rustic decor statement with shiplap wainscoting.
Short on space but still devoted to rustic chic decor? Try a headboard-style coffee table like this multi-fitted piece, which frees up floor space without leaving you at a loss for where to store and display your belongings. Convenient woven baskets can be easily slid under the unit for additional storage options, while a sparse floor plan and clean white surfaces optimize your interior space. This living room piece is the perfect balance between practicality and artisan sensibility, and isn’t that what the rustic design philosophy is all about?

In the living area of this Martha's Vineyard home, furnishings are awash in a sea of blues, but slight variations in tone and subtle patchwork motifs take the place of sharply contrasting patterns and hues. A patchwork rug from Nomadic Trading Company anchors the living area, furnished with linen sofas and a wingback chair by Cisco. The glass top on Groundwork's reclaimed-oak coffee table displays a collage of vintage art.
This impossibly pretty rustic chic living room could very well have been lifted right out of the pages of a Jane Austen novel. Bright, uncluttered walls and a lush porcelain urn floral arrangement are tempered by a handsome antique steamer trunk table (think Elizabeth Bennet meets Mr. Darcy), while clean canvas armchairs offer a more free-form alternative to traditional sofa seating. Perfect for intimate or limited spaces, this simple but timeless design scheme is fit for literary minded and heroic of heart.
Designers Cecilia Sagrera and George Brazil of Sagrera Brazil Design created zones in this open-plan living area. "Using a curved sofa with curved console behind it helps to separate the living and dining areas. Using a few curved pieces of furniture helps to break up the hard angles of the architecture." If you have an open-plan living room, consider incorporating some curved pieces of furniture. 
Bringing plants and flowers into a room always adds a designer flair to your decor, and the living room is one of my favorite places to add flowers, since we are often entertaining. These mini flower arrangements will look great on your bookshelf, coffee table or mantle. DIY your way into awesome decor with this easy to follow step by step tutorial.
The fiddle leaf fig tree definitely wins the popularity contest as far as design favorites for indoor trees. And for good reason: They look great with pretty much any interior design scheme, from bohemian to modern spaces like this one designed by Hecker Guthrie. It really freshens up the cooler gray tones of the living room and makes that floral-printed pillow pop even more.
A 1920s Palm Beach home, owned by art adviser Heidi McWilliams, serves as the perfect backdrop for displaying her impressive collection. The living room is furnished with claret armchairs (right) and hexagonal table by Rose Tarlow Melrose House, along with a neutral rug by Patterson Flynn Martin. An Anish Kapoor mirrored wall sculpture accentuates the 16th-century Italian limestone mantel, and the coffered ceiling, which is original, adds character to the room.
Aside from the adorable dogs (Jacob and Wylo) cuddled up on the armchair-meets-dog-bed, that gallery wall is the clear statement-maker in this living room designed by Philip Mitchell. Mix and match frames for a subtle nod of personality. And speaking of personal touches, consider hanging art that means something to you, whether it's your children's artwork, your own, or a portrait of your pets.

Materials that connect to the location are key to character building. Sisal hints at the marsh grasses in an elegant way and is also durable, easy to clean, and ideal for layering. The alligator skull speaks to the local wildlife, while palms in antique glass and fern-patterned pillows are additional nods to the room's Lowcountry vibe and provide a carefree polish.
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