So the interior didn't compete with views of the farm, the owner of this Alberta farmhouse opted for crisp white paint on the walls and ceiling, and blue draperies that complement the large stretch of sky outside the windows. Light pine floors with a single coat of whitewash allow the wood's natural grain to show without taking away from the room's airy feel.
In the living room of Steven Gambrel's Chicago apartment, the custom sofa, in a JAB Anstoetz fabric, is by Dune, the 1950s chair (left) is in a Dedar fabric, and the custom armchair is covered in Arabel fabrics; the 1930s orange lacquer–and-shagreen sideboard is French, the 1950s Murano glass table lamp is by Seguso, the 1955 chandelier is by FontanaArte, the custom rug is by Beauvais, and the Venetian plaster walls are in Benjamin Moore’s Stonington Gray.
In the living room of Jean-Louis Deniot's Miami penthouse, the sofa from Deniot’s collection for Baker is in a Martyn Thompson Studio fabric, the 1930s Jindrich Halabala chairs are in a JAB Anstoetz fabric, the vintage cocktail table is by Paul Frankl, and the gold side table is by Hervé Van der Straeten; the 1920s bronze-and-alabaster chandelier once hung in the Villa Kerylos in France, the indoor-outdoor rug is by Galerie Diurne, the artwork is by Franz Kline, and the shelf holds a Roger Desserprit sculpture (center) and a French 1940s lamp.
Winter wonderland or mermaid’s abode? The silvery, shimmery rustic chic decor of this living room leaves either open for interpretation. Grays, ivories, silvers, and taupes abound in this lovely communal space, with pillow-piled sofas and large (and slightly clam shaped) floor cushions providing ample options for reclining in comfort. A multi-toned wall lamp and tall candles give off a soft white light that’s ideal for such intimate and ethereal interiors. Tip: try to keep wall hangings and floor clutter at a minimum to enhance the elegance and add to the ethereal quality of the decor.
Materials that connect to the location are key to character building. Sisal hints at the marsh grasses in an elegant way and is also durable, easy to clean, and ideal for layering. The alligator skull speaks to the local wildlife, while palms in antique glass and fern-patterned pillows are additional nods to the room's Lowcountry vibe and provide a carefree polish.
In the living room of an antique-laden apartment in Greenwich Village, the antique Swedish sofa and Baroque chair, right, are upholstered in Robert Kime fabrics, the armchair is 18th-century French and a vintage Persian Soumak rug from Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar rests on a sea-grass rug from ABC Carpet & Home. Among the items on the wall are an antique water-buffalo skull, 19th-century French gouaches and a drawing by Jean Cocteau.
Paint is affordable, transformative, and easily applied by novice decorators. Use it to color walls, update flea market furnishings, refresh tired floors, and showcase a room's architectural features. Choose wall colors that further a mood (the deeper the tone, the cozier the feel) and that complement your finest furnishings and personal style preferences. 

"Soft pink was used here as a neutral base," which connects all the other elements throughout the space," say the design duo behind 2LG Studio. "We designed bespoke plywood joinery throughout to unite the spaces and create much needed storage,"they add. If you're bored of looking at stark white walls, try a soft color that can function as a neutral but exciting backdrop.


Employing expensive materials in restrained but meaningful ways lets you enjoy the finer things while staying on budget. Display a fancy wallpaper on a focal wall or as a patterned backdrop for built-in shelves. Buy one really good leather chair, but pair it with a less expensive garden-seat table. Create pillows that showcase pricey silks, brocades, and velvets on their face, but that boast inexpensive fabric backs.
In the living room of Steven Gambrel's Chicago apartment, the custom sofa, in a JAB Anstoetz fabric, is by Dune, the 1950s chair (left) is in a Dedar fabric, and the custom armchair is covered in Arabel fabrics; the 1930s orange lacquer–and-shagreen sideboard is French, the 1950s Murano glass table lamp is by Seguso, the 1955 chandelier is by FontanaArte, the custom rug is by Beauvais, and the Venetian plaster walls are in Benjamin Moore’s Stonington Gray.
Some of the best flea market, antique, or salvaged finds don't always appear to have an immediate use. When you come across something you love yet don't know where to put it, buy it and tuck it away as a rainy-day rustic decorating idea. As your living room design comes together, you'll find new ways to use old finds. In this rustic living room, for example, an 18th-century wall cabinet with its original paint stands in as a charming side table, and a wood crate becomes a coffee table centerpiece.
If Marie Antoinette moved to modern New York City this would most likely be her living room decorating style of choice. Undoubtedly feminine but unabashedly opulent, this rustic hybrid space is illuminated by a Versailles-worthy chandelier, with plush carpeting and faux fur throws epitomizing all the comforts the elite could crave. Stylish scroll work shelving and a solid wooden coffee table uphold the rustic end of the aesthetic while a silver pocket watch clock and garden accents add a refreshingly personal touch. Best of all the creamy white and smooth taupe tones open up and brighten the space, offering smaller interiors a chance to shine in their own right.

19. You can choose to use glass showcase according to the architecture and decoration style of the room. Imagine that you are using the most elegant decorative objects, trinkets or accessories in a fine elegant display case. It’s not a hall, I hear you say. It doesn’t matter from a single showcase, it’s good to make a little difference. What is important is the integrity of the overall design.

Designers Heather Brock and Jennifer Wundrow of Nest Design Co. used a rug larger than the overall seating to make the room feel bigger. "This is often a misconception we find in people’s homes. They are of the mindset that a smaller rug makes a room feel larger, when in fact a smaller rug can make the room feel a bit more fragmented. We love when all the furniture sits on the rug creating an intimate and cohesive space," according to the designers.
Pale and pristine decor meet their more primitive match with faux fur coverings, to name only a few of the charming contrasts in this rustic chic living room. Mixing tones and textures is the hallmark of great living room decorating, and this room’s careful blending of refined furnishings (glass topped coffee table and domed candle covering) and heavier fur throws and pillows, with delicate floral touches interspersed throughout, is the epitome of a modishly balanced rustic style.

In a Buenos Aires home, the original marble mantel in the living room was specified by Maison Jansen, who decorated the apartment in the 1930s. The circa-1940 chairs in the foreground, the console (left), and the side table (right) were designed by Jean-Michel Frank for the Argentine firm Comte. The 1930s Frits Henningsen settee is covered in a Holland & Sherry mohair, the chairs next to the fireplace are 18th-century Gustavian, the circa-1950 Sphere cocktail table and lamp are by Jean Royère, and the 1930s table (front left) and sconces are by Maison Jansen.


This impossibly pretty rustic chic living room could very well have been lifted right out of the pages of a Jane Austen novel. Bright, uncluttered walls and a lush porcelain urn floral arrangement are tempered by a handsome antique steamer trunk table (think Elizabeth Bennet meets Mr. Darcy), while clean canvas armchairs offer a more free-form alternative to traditional sofa seating. Perfect for intimate or limited spaces, this simple but timeless design scheme is fit for literary minded and heroic of heart.
Aside from the adorable dogs (Jacob and Wylo) cuddled up on the armchair-meets-dog-bed, that gallery wall is the clear statement-maker in this living room designed by Philip Mitchell. Mix and match frames for a subtle nod of personality. And speaking of personal touches, consider hanging art that means something to you, whether it's your children's artwork, your own, or a portrait of your pets.

Pale and pristine decor meet their more primitive match with faux fur coverings, to name only a few of the charming contrasts in this rustic chic living room. Mixing tones and textures is the hallmark of great living room decorating, and this room’s careful blending of refined furnishings (glass topped coffee table and domed candle covering) and heavier fur throws and pillows, with delicate floral touches interspersed throughout, is the epitome of a modishly balanced rustic style.
19. You can choose to use glass showcase according to the architecture and decoration style of the room. Imagine that you are using the most elegant decorative objects, trinkets or accessories in a fine elegant display case. It’s not a hall, I hear you say. It doesn’t matter from a single showcase, it’s good to make a little difference. What is important is the integrity of the overall design.
"Soft pink was used here as a neutral base," which connects all the other elements throughout the space," say the design duo behind 2LG Studio. "We designed bespoke plywood joinery throughout to unite the spaces and create much needed storage,"they add. If you're bored of looking at stark white walls, try a soft color that can function as a neutral but exciting backdrop.
Take a good look around your living room. What are the aspects of the room that you find unpleasant? Is the room cluttered with books? Is it too dark? Is the paint faded? Do you feel that it is outdated? The first thing is to decide on what you want to change. Try picking out a theme. Would you like the living room to feel modern? Minimalist? Cottage? Traditional? Or do you just want to brighten it up? Deciding on how you want the room to look will prevent you from binge shopping for new décor.
A Brooklyn townhouse in Windsor Terrace, Brooklyn, features a sofa from ABC Carpet & Home upholstered in a fabric by Soraya Shah for Studio Four NYC. The space also includes a chaise by Timothy Oulton, a Danish cocktail table, the Akari pendant light by Noguchi, window treatments in a Rebecca Atwood fabric, and a vintage Moroccan rug. The walls are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Huntington White and the trim in Iron Mountain. A photograph by Claire Nitze and a cameo portrait by Doug Meyer complete the living room.
Pale and pristine decor meet their more primitive match with faux fur coverings, to name only a few of the charming contrasts in this rustic chic living room. Mixing tones and textures is the hallmark of great living room decorating, and this room’s careful blending of refined furnishings (glass topped coffee table and domed candle covering) and heavier fur throws and pillows, with delicate floral touches interspersed throughout, is the epitome of a modishly balanced rustic style.
When shopping for living room furniture, remember that 'budget-friendly' means nothing if the furniture isn't well-built, made with durable materials and designed to last. While furniture pieces of low quality will need to be replaced time and time again, costing you more in the long run, affordable furniture crafted from solid wood, thick wood veneers, 100% leather and high-density foam will keep you – and your wallet – happy and comfortable for years to come.
Contemporary living room décor resists the minutiae of ornamentation and instead puts the focus on space, shape, and color. Its lightweight construction and pliable materials allows designers to explore sleeker lines and implement more daring shapes into their living room decorating ideas. Contemporary style makes a bold statement without being overstated. Browse Living Spaces’ selection of contemporary furniture for living room ideas.
You'll find affordable area rugs suiting every style at big box stores, discount home shops, and even home improvement centers (shop end-of-summer sales for outdoor rugs that can work inside). Use simple (and more affordable) large rugs to anchor a room's furnishings and smaller rugs to define conversational groupings or activity areas. Experts recommend that all furniture sits atop the rug and that an ample border of flooring is seen around the rug's perimeter.
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